I’m an ER doctor – these are my do’s and don’ts for holiday illnesses and animal attacks, from why you should NEVER put urine on a jellyfish sting to the best ointments for sunburn


Posted by Ted Thornhill, Mailonline Travel Editor

14:44 April 28, 2024, Updated 14:44 April 28, 2024



In the emergency room, Dr. Jordan Wagner, also known as Dr. ER, treats everything from gunshot wounds to burn injuries.

He also answers health-related questions on social media channels like TikTok, Instagram, and YouTube.

Here, Dr. Wagner moves on to the topic of staying healthy during the holidays, from why you shouldn’t urinate on a jellyfish sting to the best ointments, and what you should and shouldn’t do when it comes to treating illnesses and animal bites. I made it clear in an email that I couldn’t do it. For the treatment of sunburn.

We also provide important tips for dealing with food poisoning, dehydration, and frostbite.

sunburn

“Avoid peeling or picking at sunburned skin or applying petroleum-based products, as this can trap heat and worsen the burn,” says Dr. Wagner.

do

“Apply aloe vera or a soothing lotion to the affected area,” says Dr. Wagner. Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated. And take over-the-counter pain relievers to reduce inflammation and discomfort. ”

stop it

“Avoid peeling or picking at sunburned skin or applying petroleum-based products, as this can trap heat and worsen the burn,” says Dr. Wagner. Also, don’t ignore serious symptoms such as blisters, fever, and chills, as they may require medical attention. ”

heatstroke

do

Dr. Wagner says, “Remove excess clothing and apply a cool, wet cloth to the skin.” If the patient is conscious and able to swallow, give them a sip of water. If your symptoms worsen or if you lose consciousness, seek emergency medical assistance. ”

Dr. Jordan Wagner, also known as Dr. ER

stop it

“If the person is unconscious or unable to swallow, don’t give them fluids,” says Dr. Wagner. Don’t cool them with ice or ice water, as this can constrict blood vessels and prevent heat from dissipating. Also, seek medical attention without delay, as heat stroke can be life-threatening if not treated immediately. ”

food poisoning

do

“Stay hydrated by drinking clear fluids, such as water or electrolyte solutions,” says Dr. Wagner. Once the vomiting and diarrhea have stopped, eat bland, easily digestible foods like crackers, rice, and bananas. .

“Also, seek medical attention if your symptoms persist or worsen, especially if you are severely dehydrated or have bloody diarrhea.”

stop it

Dr. Wagner says, “Avoid dairy products, spices, and fatty foods, which can further upset your stomach.” Don’t take antidiarrheal medications without consulting your health care professional. And to prevent the spread of illness, avoid handling or preparing food for others until you have fully recovered. ”

Stung by Krafish

“If you get a jellyfish sting, don’t wash it off with alcohol or urine, as this can make the injury worse,” says Dr. Wagner.

do

Dr. Wagner says, “Rinse the affected area with vinegar to neutralize the venom.” Remove the tentacles with tweezers. Be careful not to come into direct contact with your skin. Also, seek medical attention if your symptoms are severe or if the sting involves a large area of ​​your body. ”

stop it

“Do not flush the area with fresh water, as this may activate any remaining toxins,” says Dr. Wagner. Do not use alcohol or urine to clean the sting area, as this can make the wound worse. Also, don’t ignore signs of an allergic reaction, such as difficulty breathing or swelling of the face, lips, or throat. ”

Bitten by a poisonous spider, snake, centipede, or scorpion

Dr. Wagner warns against trying to suck out poison

do

“Try to immobilize the bite area and keep it below heart level to slow the spread of the venom,” says Dr. Wagner. Wash the wound with soap and water to reduce the risk of infection, and apply a cold compress or ice pack wrapped in a cloth to reduce swelling and pain.

“And, especially if you’ve been bitten by a venomous snake or spider, seek medical attention right away.” Not all hospitals or medical facilities carry antivenom, but the nearest one that carries antivenom It is important to note that you can be introduced to the following facilities. ”

stop it

“Do not attempt to suck out the venom or make an incision near the bite site, as this may worsen tissue damage,” says Dr. Wagner.

“Do not apply a tourniquet or constriction band over the bite, as the venom may become trapped in the area. Also, venomous bites can be life-threatening if not treated immediately. , even if your symptoms are mild, don’t delay seeing your doctor.

stung by a wasp

“Do not use tweezers to remove it,” says Dr. Wagner. [wasp] Because the needle can push more venom into the wound. ”

do

“Remove the needles by scraping them with a credit card or something blunt, being careful not to put pressure on them,” says Dr. Wagner. Wash the affected area with soap and water to reduce the risk of infection, and apply a cold compress or ice pack wrapped in a cloth to reduce pain and swelling. Take over-the-counter antihistamines and painkillers if needed. ”

stop it

If you are dehydrated, do not drink fluids until you are thirsty. Thirst is a slow sign of dehydration. Doctor IS

Dr. Wagner says, “Do not use tweezers to remove the needle, as this may introduce more venom into the wound.” Avoid scratching or rubbing the affected area, as this can worsen inflammation and discomfort. Also, don’t ignore signs of an allergic reaction, such as difficulty breathing or swelling of the face, lips, or throat. Seek medical help as soon as possible. ”

dehydration

do

Dr. Wagner says, “Drink lots of fluids, especially water, to replenish lost fluids and electrolytes.” Rest in a cool, shaded area to prevent further fluid loss through sweating. If your symptoms are severe or if you continue to feel dehydrated even after drinking fluids, seek medical attention. ”

stop it

Dr. Wagner says, “Avoid alcoholic or caffeinated beverages, as they can increase urine output and worsen dehydration.” Thirst is a sign of dehydration, so if your throat feels dry, There is no need to drink water until you are thirsty. Don’t ignore symptoms of dehydration such as dry mouth, dark urine, and dizziness. ”

frostbite

do

“Gradually warm the tissue by soaking the affected area in warm rather than boiling water or applying a warm compress,” says Dr. Wagner. If possible, elevate the affected area to reduce swelling. Also, be sure to seek medical attention if you have severe frostbite or if your skin becomes pale, numb, or waxy. ”

stop it

“Avoid using direct heat sources such as hand warmers or fire to warm the skin, as this can cause burns,” says Dr. Wagner. Avoid massaging or manipulating the affected area as this may increase tissue damage. Also, don’t ignore signs of hypothermia or shock. These can be accompanied by severe frostbite and may require immediate medical attention. ”

hypothermia

Dr. Wagner says trying to warm up a hypothermic person too quickly can cause cardiac arrest.

do

“Move to a warm, dry area and remove wet clothing,” says Dr. Wagner. If the patient is conscious and able to swallow, wrap the patient in blankets or warm clothing and offer hot drinks. Then, monitor your breathing and pulse, and seek medical attention if necessary. ”

stop it

“Don’t try to warm up the body too quickly, as this can cause shock or cardiac arrest,” says Dr. Wagner. Also, avoid rubbing or massaging the person’s limbs, as this can cause further tissue damage. Also, don’t give alcohol, caffeine, or tobacco, as they can worsen hypothermia. ”

wild animal bite

do

“Clean the wound with soap and water to reduce the risk of infection,” says Dr. Wagner. Apply antiseptic cream or ointment to the wound and cover it with a sterile bandage. And, especially if the animal is unknown or suspected to be carrying rabies, seek medical attention for proper wound evaluation and administration of rabies vaccine or immune globulin. ”

stop it

“Wild animal bites can lead to serious infections and diseases such as rabies, so don’t ignore bites, even if they seem minor,” says Dr. Wagner. Do not vaccinate or treat dogs for rabies without medical supervision. Also, do not wait to see a doctor, as prompt treatment can prevent complications and ensure proper wound treatment. ”

Learn more about Doctor ER here www.youtube.com/@DoctorER, twitter.com/DoctorER and www.instagram.com/doctorer.





Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *